Vaccines For Your Cat

Routine vaccines for your cat include: Feline Viral Rhinotrachetis, Calicivirus, Panleukopenia and Rabies. Optional vaccines for your cat include: Feline Leukemia Virus, Feline Chlamydia infection and Feline Immunodeficiency Virus. 

Feline Viral Rhinotracheitis (FVR) is caused by the FVR virus and is also known as Feline Herpes Virus type-1. FVR is a deadly and contagious upper respiratory virus seen in cats. Symptoms included sneezing and discharge from the eyes, loss of appetite, high fever, dehydration and death. Contraction of this virus is high in populations of numerous cats kept in close contact.

Calicivirus is a contagious upper respiratory virus. Symptoms include loss of appetite, high fever, and ulcers on the tongue and sometimes on the eye. Contraction commonly occurs between infected animals in close contact.

Panleukopenia is caused by a virus of the Parvovirus family. It is essentially a decrease in the number of the body’s white blood cells, the main cell involved in immunity and fighting off infection. Symptoms typically show as depression or listlessness which may progress to collapse. The virus is shed in all excretions, particularly in the feces of infected cats. It can be ingested directly or transferred to a healthy cat via contaminated water, feed bowls, or on shoes and clothing.

Feline Leukemia Virus (FeLV) is one of the most important infectious viruses of cats. FeLV invades and replicates in various cells of the cat’s immune system and blood-forming tissues, as well as other cells. The result can be death of the cell or a change in its genetic code. Such a change in cells can potentially lead to cancer. Environment and the life-style of the cat play a major role in the likelihood of contraction of this disease. Though not a standard vaccine it is recommended to owners of cats who are allowed access to the outdoors.

Feline Chlamydia Infection or chlamydia is an infection caused by a bacterium-like organism. Most problems associated with Chlamydia infection in cats involve inflammation of the upper respiratory tract particularly conjunctivitis (inflammation of surrounding tissues of the eyes) that is often recurrent or chronic. The infection lives inside cells of the body and the spread of infection relies on direct or close contact with an infected cat. Though not a standard vaccine it is recommended to owners of cats who are allowed access to the outdoors.

Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (FIV) is a virus affecting felines, though similar in some characteristics to the human AIDS virus, it cannot be contracted by people. Transmission of infection to another cat requires direct inoculation of the saliva through bite from an infected, shedding cat. FIV causes disease because it reduces the ability of the cat’s immune system to respond to other infections, and infections that would ordinarily be treated and cured with antibiotics are prolonged and can become chronic or reoccurring. Only secondary bacterial infections associated with FIV can be treated however, unfortunately, once a cat is infected with FIV it will carry it for life. FIV in most cases, will shorten the life span of a cat quite significantly. Though not a standard vaccine it is recommended to owners of cats who are allowed access to the outdoors.